Oracle vs. SQL Server

Database Comparision

Table of Contents

1.Introduction

2.Operational Concerns

a.Scalability

b.Platform Availability

c.Networking & Internet Readiness

3.Vendor Related Issues

a.Licensing

b.Support and Maintenance

4.User Considerations

a.DBA Concerns

b.Programmability

5.Conclusion


Appendix A - System Requirements for Microsoft SQL Server 7.0

Appendix B - Maximum Sizes and Numbers of SQL Server 7.0

Appendix C - Scorecard of Microsoft’s SQL Server & Oracle’s 8i

Appendix D - Summary of Features of Microsoft’s SQL Server & Oracle’s 8i

Appendix E - Oracle 8 and Oracle 8i Standard Edition Platform Availability

 

 

SQL Server 7.0 Introduction

SQL Server 7.0 is designed to scale from laptop databases and small business servers all the way up to terabyte-size databases.SQL Server 7.0 is designed to operate on Microsoft’s Windows 95, 98 and NT operating systems.However, the Windows 95 & 98 versions of SQL Server 7.0 only support desktop, laptop and small workgroup applications.SQL Server 7.0 for Windows NT Workstation has been developed for applications that involve a large numbers of users and transactions.

Microsoft SQL Server had 30% of the Windows NT database market in 1998, while Oracle had 46.1% of the Windows NT market, which was a 55% growth in 1998.This statistic must be understood in the context that it applies only to the Windows NT platform, since that is the only platform that both Microsoft and Oracle have in common.

Although, Microsoft has taken a big step forward in enterprise capability with the SQL Server 7.0, it seems like their product is more appropriate for departmental and small to mid-sized companies.“Rewritten for ease of use, Microsoft’s SQL Server 7.0 is far and away the best choice for smaller organizations or branch offices that need a full-featured relational database.Larger organizations will find SQL Server a better performer than ever before, although competing databases including Oracle 8 and DB2 continue to provide better programmability and scalability.”[ii]

In speaking with a few experienced database administrators and programmers, SQL Server really is not known as a competitor with the “big boys” of the relational database software market.The well-known database software products include Oracle, IBM’s DB2, Sybase and Informix.These companies remain leaders in database technology at the enterprise level.

Oracle 8i Introduction

Oracle 8i is a database product that is built upon a mature Oracle 8 product, but also brings increased capabilities to develop and integrate with Internet applications.Oracle’s databases have been developed and proven to handle the largest of enterprise databases.But Oracle also targets smaller, mid-tier companies who find it necessary to have 24 hours by 7 days availability due to increasing Internet business needs.Oracle’s 8i databases are available on a wide variety of platforms.Dell, IBM, Linux, Sun, Fujitsu and Unisys are a few of the 21 listed on Oracle’s web site.

Oracle’s products are definitely not the cheapest on the market. If an evaluation of the application necessitates a high need for reliability, scalability, security and performance then Oracle should be considered. Oracle is the world’s leading supplier of software for information management, holding 27% of the database market share across all platforms.Oracle is the undisputed database leader on UNIX platforms, commanding 60.9% of the market share according to Dataquest.[iii],[iv]

2.Operational Concerns

a. Scalability

Scalability in the context of database software is defined as the software’s ability to continue to perform at a similar level with a larger amount of data and a growing number of users and transactions.

Amount of Data

Both SQL Server 7.0 and Oracle 8i are designed to be client-server database products that can take advantage of distributed database architecture.

A distributed database is a network of databases managed by multiple database servers that appears to a user as a single database. This means the database could be distributed across several disks and servers with multiple processors.The data of all databases in the distributed databases can be simultaneously accessed and modified. The database architecture on the server will dictate how fast the transaction response time is.The speed of transactions can vary greatly based on the database design as well as server hardware configurations, including RAM, the number and speed of the CPUs.

SQL Server 7.0 can grow up to 1,048,516 terra-bytes.Microsoft uses SMP (systems with 4 processors) technology to distribute databases. Other maximum sizes and numbers can be referenced in Appendix C, which outlines other technical specifications of SQL Server 7.0.

Oracle 8i is scalable up to hundreds of terabytes to manage very large databases (VLDB).Oracle takes advantage of distributed processing and storage capabilities through architectural features that use more than one processor to divide the processing for a set of related jobs.This distributed architecture is a good example of the expression “the sum of the parts is greater than the whole”, because as individual processors work on a subset of related tasks, performance of the whole system is improved.


Number of Simultaneous Users

Theoretically, there is no limit to the number of users that can access either the Oracle 8i or SQL Server 7.0 database servers at one time, given infinite processors and infinite speed.In practical terms, there is a limit, but it should not pose any real issues to be concerned with in terms of concurrent data.One consideration is that SQL Servers will require ODBC software to connect with clients that are not PC based.This will require some overhead, but should be pretty negligible. 

In a “Score Card” published by ZDNet[v], which is fully documented in Appendix D, the following ratings were published.These ratings really demonstrate the equality of SQL Server and Oracle for these performance criteria.


 


PC Microsoft SQL Server 7.0

Oracle8i Standard Edition

Server Engine

Excellent

Good

Support for multiple CPUs

Excellent

Fair

Join and index selection

Excellent

Excellent

Degree of concurrency

Good

Excellent

Database Design

Good

Excellent

Distributed transactions

Excellent

Excellent

These issues of are fundamental topics when performance is being discussed.

b.Platform Availability

As discussed in the Introduction, SQL Server 7.0 is designed to operate on Microsoft’s Windows 95, 98 and NT 4.0 operating systems.However, the Windows 95 & 98 versions of SQL Server 7.0 will only support desktop, laptop and small workgroup applications and requires an Intel platform.

SQL Server 7.0 for Windows NT Workstation has been developed for applications that involve a large numbers of users and transactions and is limited to Intel or Alpha platforms.

This limitation could cause hurdles for large corporations in terms of performance that can be expected.Brian McCarthy, CEO of Insurance Holdings said “Microsoft said we’d need an all-Microsoft application if we wanted full scalability, but who’s going to rebuild the whole system?”[vi]

It’s especially important to note that although other platforms can be used for clients to access the SQL Server 7.0, a third party ODBC software must be used.ODBC is an interface that allows for data to be accessed in relational databases, independent of the database vendor.

Oracle 8i is supported by a large number of hardware manufacturers, as well as several operating systems.There are currently 21 hardware vendors listed on Oracle’s website, with at least 6 operating systems, counting UNIX as one although the flavors may vary by manufacturer.Reference Appendix F for details on some of the platforms and operating systems that Oracle runs on.Further details can be found on specific platforms at Oracle’s dedicated website:www.platforms.oracle.com.

 
Networking & Internet Readiness
The need for a database to be Internet ready is quickly becoming a necessity in today’s rapidly growing web based world. At every turn in the software industry, the topic of e-business and e-commerce is a top issue for companies wanting to compete in the future. Therefore, the need for database software to support and enhance Internet application development is a must.
 
SQL Server 7.0 still lags behind in its ability to support multimedia data support and in programmability, which are necessary for many Internet applications. Third party software will have to be used to store special images, sound, video or geographic data support. SQL Server 7.0 doesn’t support Java, which is an industry standard for developing network applications.
 
Oracle 8i is the best product for companies wanting to move their database applications to the Web. Oracle leads the market in handling of multimedia objects. Multimedia support is particularly relevant when building Web-based applications like online stores that include multimedia items such as pictures or video clips of items for sale. Oracle uses a product call JServer, which brings Java and relational databases together. It allows for controlling the database through Java and supports the creation of JavaBeans. JavaBeans are the basic building blocks for Java-based Internet applications, and are (or will be) supported by just about every high-end Internet application server on the market.

In the ZDNet Scorecard (Appendix D), SQL Server 7.0 and Oracle 8i were rated as follows, in respect to their internet readiness features:

 
 


Microsoft SQL Server 7.0

Oracle8i Standard Edition

Multimedia Data Handling

Poor

Excellent

Web connectivity

Poor

Excellent

Support for sound, media, video, images

Poor

Excellent

Full text search

Good

Excellent

3. Vendor Related Issues

a.Licensing

SQL Server

Pricing structures of software can be complex.Microsoft recognizes this and even offers “A Guide to BackOffice Pricing and Licensing” to help readers understand some of the subtleties and complexities before “cutting a check”. SQL Server can be purchased by itself in either of the above-mentioned versions, as an upgrade to certain other database products or as a part of Microsoft BackOffice.A license for the server is distinct from the licenses for the CAL (client access license), but every server is accompanied with a certain number of CALS.Although the number of CALS may vary by application, there would always be a need for at least one CAL or the database could not be accessed to retrieve data.

To compare prices the details of the system architecture must be well understood.Some of those details include the number of servers required to support the database, how many processors a server will have, the number of users needing to access the database, whether the system will be serving an Internet or intranet application.

Based on an application where 250 or more users (CALs) will be accessing one database server, the cost of SQL Server 7.0 Enterprise Version is listed as $28,999 on Microsoft web site.To get an understanding of the price differences between the Enterprise version and the Standard version, SQL Server 7.0 Standard Version and Five CALs would cost $3,999, while the Enterprise version with Five CALs lists at $7999.An upgrade of the SQL Server 7.0 Enterprise version for a customer who is also upgrading the clients accessing the database costs $3969, while a customer who is buying licenses for new clients along with the server license costs $7099.

The benefits of the Enterprise Edition over the Standard Edition cited in the Microsoft publications get blurred in the marketing jargon.The Enterprise version is used for increased system scalability and reliability by providing support for SMP (systems with multiple processors) and extended memory

These prices are negotiable and the price varies in terms of how customer acquires the SQL Server.For example, if a customer purchases software that runs on SQL Server or purchases it from an independent software vendor then the pricing would obviously be different.

Oracle 8i

Oracle’s pricing structure is different from Microsoft’s, in that it doesn’t charge per server license or client access license.Rather Oracle charges by licensing units:“named user”, “concurrent system” and “power unit”.

A named user is defined as “an individual who is authorized by his/her company to use the Oracle Software programs, regardless of whether the individual is actively using these programs at any given time.”[vii]

A concurrent device is defined as “an input device accessing the program on the designated system at any given point in time. The number of "Concurrent Devices" you are licensed for is the maximum number of input devices accessing the programs on the Designated System at any given point in time. If multiplexing hardware or software (e.g., a TP Monitor or a Web server product) is used, this number must be measured at the multiplexing front-end.”vii

A power unit is defined as one MHz of power in any Intel compatible or RISC processor in any computer of the Designated Systems on the Order Confirmation page on which the Oracle software programs are installed and operating. (Intel refers to Intel Solaris, Linux, and Windows NT; RISC refers to Sun SPARC Solaris, HP-UX, and IBM/AIX. A "Processor" license shall be for the actual number of processors installed in the licensed computer and running the Oracle program(s), regardless of the number of processors which the computer is capable of running.)”vii

A named user licensing unit costs $600, a concurrent device costs $1495 and a power unit costs $200 for the Oracle 8i Enterprise Edition.These prices are 5 times more than what Oracle charges for the Standard Edition.

The Enterprise Editions includes these advanced features on top of the Standard Edition:large-database partitioning (which helps you keep monster gigabyte-size databases under control), flexible security features, and speed features such as bitmapped indexes, summary tables, and parallelism.

Two other modules that Oracle offers for enhanced web integration and multi-media handling are Oracle JServer Standard Edition and WebDB, which if necessary add to the total cost of the Oracle solution.They are also priced based on the licensing unit discussed above.

b.Support and Maintenance

Availability of qualified database administrators (DBA) and programmers is one issue that cannot be overlooked in considering which database will be best for the given organization and application.Due to the relationship between supply, demand and cost, the shortage of Oracle DBAs and programmers can mean only mean one thing.They are hard to find and when one is available, they command a very high salary.

The nature of Oracle is that it can be more difficult to program and administer, so it requires specially trained personnel.SQL Server, on the other hand, is an easier product to learn and administer so the number of available programmers is higher and less expensive to staff a database project. 

No cost information could be obtained on the annual maintenance fees to remain current on the licensing agreements with either Oracle or SQL Server.

4. User Considerations

a. Database Administrator (DBA) Concerns

Recovery & Backup

In every database system, the possibility of a system or hardware failure always exists. Should a failure occur and affect the database, the database must be recovered. The goals after a failure are to ensure that the effects of all committed transactions are reflected in the recovered database and to return to normal operations as quickly as possible while insulating users from problems caused by the failure. Databases can fail due power outages, operating system crashes, disk failure or operator error.

 

Both SQL Server 7.0 and Oracle make commitments on a two-phase commit approach, which allows for users to control a logical set of SQL statements so they all either succeed or fail as a unit. This two-phase mechanism guarantees that no matter what type of system or network failure might occur, a distributed transaction either commits on all involved nodes or rolls back on all involved nodes to maintain data consistency across the global distributed database.

Monitoring & Tuning Capabilities

SQL Server 7.0 is an exceptionally easy product to administer and is more forgiving than previous SQL Server versions.SQL Server 7.0 has an auto-tuning feature that allows for memory to be self-managed and there are several new wizards that simply advanced tasks such as creating databases, scheduling backups, importing and exporting data and configuring replication.This should make the training of database administrators much easier.

Oracle 8i databases can be administered and controlled very tightly, but it is a complex and requires trained database administrators to do so proficiently.“Oracle8i tools are Java-based and can even be run from a Web browser. They provide all the essentials for designing and setting up a database, including some advanced features like letting you selectively delegate authority to users of its Enterprise Manager administration console. This is a handy tool for branch office deployment.Like previous releases of Enterprise Manager, though, this one is a version behind the database, and it doesn't know a thing about new Oracle8i features such as Java stored procedures.”[viii]

b.Programmability

There are languages supported within the database software for programming and controlling the database.For example, since PL/SQL can be stored in the database, network traffic between applications and the database is reduced, thereby increasing application and system performance.

SQL Server 7.0 comes with an internal programming language called Transact-SQL, which has received a poor rating in several reviews.“While everyone else in the SQL database market is moving (or has already moved) to a modern programming language like Java, SQL Server customers are still stuck in the programming Dark Ages—no object orient development, no big class libraries to use, and no code interoperability with anything else.”[ix]The programming can be done, but it will require a lot more work.

Oracle gets an excellent rating for it’s internal language offerings, which include Java and PL/SQL.

 

5.Conclusion

In comparing these two database products, it became apparent they each hold a different place and purpose in the market.They don’t compete in the same niche.Microsoft SQL Server, a client-server database, continues to make strides toward the enterprise database market, but is still most appropriate for a departmental or small to mid-sized company whose database doesn’t have such high scalability, reliability and availability needs.SQL Server’s greatest weakness is the Windows NT platform, which it operates on, is not mature enough to provide the kind of availability that enterprise worthy systems require.“In the small-business market, the differentiating factors are ease of database administration, Web connectivity, the speed and features of the database server engine, branch-office and mobile support, and the ability to warehouse data efficiently. SQL Server 7.0 shines in all of these areas except Web connectivity. Its administration tools include many wizards and self-tuning settings that make it the only database we reviewed that might not require a specially trained administrator.”[x]

Oracle, also a client-server database, operates on the high end of the database market and is also reaching out to start ups, small to medium sized businesses who have a need for a complete, integrated platform for critical applications for the internet. Oracle is harder to administer is an expensive choice, unless the application being developed requires its Java or multimedia features.Another selling point to Oracle is that is it sold on a multitude of platforms, in comparison to SQL Server 7.0, which may be appealing to some customers who are seeking a more mature platform.



Appendix A

System Requirements for Microsoft SQL Server 7.0*

Client Access Licenses required

Server

·PC with a Pentium (166 MHz or higher) or Alpha processor 

·Microsoft Windows NT Server operating system version 4.0 or Windows NT Server 4.0 Enterprise Edition with Service Pack 4 or later (Service Pack 4 included) 

·Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.01 with Service Pack 1 or later (both included) 

·32 MB of RAM 

·Hard-disk space required: 

·65–180 MB for Server; approximately 170 MB for typical installation 

·35–50 MB for OLAP services; approximately 50 MB for typical installation 

·24–36 MB for English Query; approximately 36 MB for typical installation 

·CD-ROM drive 

·VGA or higher-resolution monitor; Super VGA recommended 

·Microsoft Mouse or compatible pointing device

Note SQL Server 7.0 can utilize up to four processors. Additional processor support is available with SQL Server 7.0 Enterprise Edition. 

Desktop
Identical to Server requirements with the following exceptions: 

·Each installation of SQL Server Desktop requires a per-seat client access license for SQL Server 7.0; SQL Server Desktop will only interact with SQL Server in per-seat mode 

·65–180 MB available hard-disk space; approximately 170 MB for typical installation
Note The Desktop version of SQL Server 7.0 can utilize up to two processors. 

Networking Support Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT built-in network software (additional network software is not required unless you are using Banyan VINES or AppleTalk ADSP; Novell NetWare client support is provided by NWLink) 

Clients Supported Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT Workstation, UNIX,** Apple Macintosh,** and OS/2** 

*Actual requirements will vary based on your system configuration and the features you choose to install. 

**Requires ODBC client software from a third-party vendor.

 

 

Appendix B

Maximum Sizes and Numbers of SQL Server 7.0

This table specifies the maximum sizes and numbers of various objects defined in Microsoft SQL Server databases, or referenced in Transact-SQL statements.


 

Object

SQL Server 7.0

Batch size

128 *Network Packet Size

Bytes per character or binary column

8000

Bytes per text, ntext, or image column

2GB-2

Bytes per GROUP BY, ORDER BY

8060

Bytes per index

900

Bytes per foreign key

900

Bytes per primary key

900

Bytes per row

8060

Bytes in source text of a stored procedure

Batch size

Clustered indexes or constraints per table

1

Columns in GROUP BY, ORDER BY

Limited only by number of bytes

Columns or expressions in a GROUP BY WITH CUBE or WITH ROLLUP statement

10

Columns per index

16

Columns per foreign key

16

Columns per primary key

16

Columns per base table

1024

Columns per SELECT statement

4096

Columns per INSERT statement

1024

Connections per client

Max. value of configured connections

Database size

1,048,516 TB

Files per database

32,767

File size (data)

32 TB

Object

SQL Server 7.0

File size (log)

4 TB

FOREIGN KEY constraints per table

63

Foreign key table references per table

63

Identifier length (in characters)

128

Index key size (bytes)

900

Locks per connection

Max. value of locks configured

Nested subqueries

64

Nested trigger levels

32

Nonclustered indexes or constraints per table

250

Objects in a database *

2,147,483,647

Parameters per stored procedure

1024

PRIMARY KEY constraints per table

1

Rows per table

Limited by available storage

SQL string length

128 *TDS packet size

Tables per database

Limited by number of objects in a database

Tables per SELECT statement

256

Triggers per table

Limited by number of objects in a database

UNIQUE constraints per table

250 nonclustered and 1 clustered

* Database objects include all tables, views, stored procedures, extended stored procedures, triggers, rules, defaults, and constraints.


Appendix C

Scorecard of Microsoft’s SQL Server & Oracle’s 8i

 
 


PC Microsoft SQL Server 7.0

Oracle8i Standard Edition

Server Administration

Excellent

Good

Graphical tools

Excellent

Good

Ease of maintenance

Excellent

Good

Server Engine

Excellent

Excellent

Support for multiple CPUs

Excellent

Good

Join and index selection

Excellent

Excellent

Degree of concurrency

Good

Excellent

Multimedia Data Handling

Poor

Excellent

Web connectivity

Poor

Excellent

Support for sound, media, video, images

Poor

Excellent

Full text search

Good

Excellent

Interoperability

Good

Fair

Links with other databases

Good

Poor

Single log-on

Good

Good

Operating-system support

Fair

Good

Programmability

Fair

Excellent

Stored procedures and triggers

Good

Excellent

Internal programming language

Poor

Excellent

Database Design

Good

Excellent

SQL language support

Excellent

Excellent

Object-oriented design

Poor

Excellent

Branch Office Support

Excellent

Excellent

Replication

Excellent

Excellent

Distributed transactions

Excellent

Excellent

Remote administration

Good

Excellent

Data Warehousing and Reporting

Excellent

Excellent

Loading tools

Excellent

Excellent



Appendix D

Summary of Features of Microsoft’s SQL Server & Oracle’s 8i

 
 


Microsoft SQL Server 7.0

Oracle 8i Standard Edition

List price

$1,399 

$3,925 per CPU

Number of users included

5 users (named or concurrent)

5 concurrent users

Price for each additional concurrent user / named user

$127 / $127

$785 / $392.50

Server operating-system support

Windows NT, Windows 9x

Windows NT, multiple Unix flavors

Client software operating-system support

Windows NT, Windows 9x

All server platforms plus Windows 9x

Network protocols supported

AppleTalk, IPX, Named Pipes, TCP/IP, Vines IP

IPX, Named Pipes, TCP/IP

ADMINISTRATION



Graphical tools for:



Installing the database server

Yes

Yes

Creating and managing databases/disk devices

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Creating and managing tables/indexes

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Creating and managing stored procedures

Yes

Yes

Creating and managing users

Yes

Yes

Creating and managing replication links

Yes

Yes

Backup and restore

Yes

Yes

Web publishing

Yes

Yes

Database diagramming

Yes

Optional

Submitting SQL and viewing query results

Yes

Yes

Viewing all currently executing SQL code

Yes

Optional

Detecting resource-intensive queries/Killing queries

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Graphing server engine statistics

Yes

Yes

Execution plan display

Yes

Optional

Providing index suggestions based on a single SQL statement/on overall server usage

Yes Yes

Optional Optional

Tools have command line access

Yes

Yes

Reverse-engineer database objects/data to a SQL script

Yes No

Yes Optional

Languages supplied for command scripting

JScript, OS commands, SQL, Transact-SQL, VB Script

Java, OS commands, PL/SQL, SQL, TCL

Security audit log of administrator and user activity

No

Yes

Job scheduler can run jobs at certain times/when certain events happen

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Online manual with search engine

Yes

Yes

SERVER ENGINE



Levels of locking granularity available

Database, table, page, row

Database, table, row

Default locking level for queries

Row

Row

Readers can block writers/writers can block readers at default isolation level

No Yes

No No

Can use multiple CPUs on database load/within a query/to create an index

Yes Yes No

Yes Optional Optional

Can use multiple CPUs on database backup and restore/on update/on delete

Yes No No

Optional Optional Optional

Nested loop join/Hash join/Merge join

Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes

Semi-join for star queries

Yes

Yes

B-tree index/Clustered index/Bitmap index

Yes Yes Yes**

Yes Yes Optional

Cost-based/rule-based optimizer

Yes No

Yes Yes

Can use multiple indexes per query

Yes

Yes

Can use just the index to answer the query

Yes

Yes

Automatically maintains necessary optimizer statistics

Yes

Yes

Dynamic SQL statements parameterized and cached

Yes

Yes

Can mark tables as memory-resident

Yes

Yes

Dynamic memory resource sharing

Yes

No

Number of CPUs supported per server

4

4

Failover server

Optional

Yes

Query resource consumption governor

Yes

Yes

Can assign priorities to different groups of users

No

Optional

Incremental backup/Restore to a specified point in time

Yes Yes

Optional Optional

Default disk data block size

8K

2K or 8K

Users can choose disk block size

No

Yes

Parallel/asynchronous (multitasking) disk operations

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Data and log devices can grow when needed

Yes

Yes

Year 2000-certified/Euro support

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

MULTIMEDIA DATA TYPES



Binary large object (BLOB)

Yes

Yes

Sound/Video/Images

No No No

Yes Yes Yes

Text documents/Geospatial data/Time series

Yes No Yes**

Yes Yes Optional

INTEROPERABILITY



Gateways to other databases

ODBC, OLE DB

Optional

Single log-on with Windows NT / LDAP / OSF DCE

Yes No No

Yes Optional Optional

PROGRAMMABILITY



Stored procedures/triggers

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Internal programming languages

Transact-SQL

Java, PL/SQL

Debugger supplied for stored procedure languages

Optional

Optional

Database client libraries supported

DB/LIB, ODBC, OLE DB

CORBA, Enterprise JavaBeans, JDBC, OCI, ODBC, Oracle Objects for OLE

QUERY LANGUAGE AND DATABASE DESIGN



SQL language version supported

SQL-92 Entry Level with extensions

SQL-92 Entry Level with extensions

ANSI isolation levels supported

Read uncommitted, read committed, repeatable read, serializable, read only

Read committed, serializable, read only

Left/right/full outer joins

Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes

Declarative referential integrity

Yes

Yes

Cascade delete/Cascade update

No No

Yes No

Object-oriented design support/Object references (REFs)

No No

Yes Yes

BRANCH OFFICE SUPPORT



One-way/bidirectional replication

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Pager/e-mail notification of errors

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Administration tools can manage a remote database

Yes

Yes

Web-based administration tools provided

No

Yes

Distributed transactions within database/with other vendors' databases

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

DATA WAREHOUSING AND REPORTING



Data loader can load directly to disk pages for speed

Yes

Yes

Data transformation and cleansing tools

Yes

Yes

Can delay constraint checking during a bulk load

Yes

Yes

Provides precalculation of summary information

Yes**

Optional

Included OLAP server

Yes

Optional

Queries automatically rewritten to use summary tables

No

Optional

Summaries understand dimensional hierarchies

Yes**

Optional

Automatic refresh of summaries when data changes

No

Optional

Can use data sampling to speed processing

No

Optional

Top n queries/Top n percent of total queries

Yes Yes

Yes No

Can handle ties when ranking top rows

Yes

No

Cube/rollup functions

Yes Yes

Yes Yes



Appendix E

Oracle 8 and Oracle 8i Standard Edition Platform Availability


 

Operating System

Chip 

Hardware 

Data General DG-UX

Intel

Any, up to 4 cpus *

Digital Unix

Alpha

Digital AlphaServer 300, 400, 800, 1000, 1000A



Digital AlphaServer 1200, 2000, 4000

Hewlett-Packard HP-UX

PA-RISC

HP9000 7xx-Series wkstns



HP9000 B-Series, C-Series wkstns



HP9000 D-Series, E-Series, A-Series



HP9000 K360 K370 K380 R380 R390

IBM/

PowerPC

RS/6000 Models: 43P, 42T/42W, C10, C20, E30, F30, F40, F50, H10, H50, H70

Bull/Motorola AIX


Bull Estrella 200, 300, 700



Bull Escala E



Motorola RISC PC Plus Series



Motorola EX Series



Motorola PowerStack II Pro2000, Pro3000, Pro4000

IBM OS/2

Intel

Any, up to 4 cpus *

Microsoft Windows NT

Alpha

Digital AlphaServer 300, 400, 800, 1000, 1000A



Digital AlphaServer 1200, 2000, 4000


Intel

Any, up to 4 cpus *


MIPS

SNI RM200, RM300

NCR MP-RAS

Intel

NCR S10, S40

Novell NetWare

Intel

Any, up to 4 cpus *

SCO UnixWare

Intel

Any, up to 4 cpus *

Siemens Nixdorf

MIPS

SNI RM200, RM300

SINIX/Reliant UNIX



Sun Solaris Intel

Intel

Any, up to 4 cpus *

Sun Solaris SPARC

SPARC

Any uniprocessor or dual processor only machine from Sun, and the Sun E450 up to 4 cpus

SGI IRIX

MIPS

O2, Octane, Origin200 (Single Tower Only)




* includes Compaq ProLiant and ProSignia, HP NetServer,



IBM Netfinity, and any other Intel-based server with up to 4 cpus.